The recent membership of North Macedonia in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is expected to mark increased activity in the defence and security reform processes, defence procurement in the country, and democratic control of the defence and security sector.

Although NATO membership is expected to have a positive security and economic impact on the country,1 increased activity related to full NATO membership will mean higher budget spending in sensitive areas, and thus increased pressure from corruption.

NATO’s North Macedonia membership will mark increased activity in defence and security reform processes, defence procurement in the country, and democratic control of the defence and security sectors, which could increase the risks of corruption. Within NATO, there are active programs and bodies that can contribute to the successful management of these risks and influence the increased oversight role of the Assembly. It is important for the Assembly to revise the existing oversight practices, to work on regular periodic oversight practices and to continuously build the capacity of the committees to perform their function.

This policy brief has three tasks. First, to draw the line between NATO and the fight against corruption. Second, to look at the technology of the process through which NATO can strengthen the oversight role of parliaments and their role in the fight against corruption in three areas: defence and security reforms, public procurement and oversight of the defence and security sector as a whole. Finally, to underline good practices to strengthen the role of parliaments in anti-corruption and enhancing good governance.

Read the policy brief here:

North Macedonia in NATO: a chance for an increased oversight role of the Parliament